Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Discuss our past interviews and ask questions for upcoming ones!

Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Redstar » Sat Jan 09, 2010 4:16 am

Collect any interviews or statements coming from someone involved with the SMB movie concerning the film.

Bob Hoskins

'Mario's Great Challenge: Despite Fearsome Odds And Galling Setbacks, It Appears The Movie Will Actually Come Out'

and

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

"All these rewrites get frustrating so I don't do too much research," says Hoskins grimly, while waiting all morning for the directors to decide the shot. "The trick is: Don't take the job too seriously, turn up and do your day's work. That's all.

"My 7-year-old son is quite depressed about my playing Mario," he says. "He knows I can't even program a VCR, yet alone play the game. How do I prepare for the role? I'm the right shape. I've got a mustache. I worked as a plumber's apprentice for about three weeks and set the plumber's boots on fire with a blowtorch.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

Pg. 9

Later, Hoskins sits in his trailer and puts the epic struggles of moviemaking into perspective: "After I did 'Roger Rabbit,' my younger son wouldn't talk to me. It took me about two weeks to figure out that he reckoned that any father who had friends like Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam, Daffy Duck, and who didn't bring them home to meet him, well, his father was a total (jerk). The basic premise of all this business is that everybody's totally insane. They are. They are completely insane. And that's wonderful."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

'The Method? Living it out? Cobblers!'

[He accepts there have been flops, and films he's detested, but that's the nature of the game.] "The worst thing I ever did? Super Mario Brothers. It was a fuckin' nightmare. The whole experience was a nightmare. It had a husband-and-wife team directing, whose arrogance had been mistaken for talent. After so many weeks their own agent told them to get off the set! Fuckin' nightmare. Fuckin' idiots."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

San Sebastian Film Festival - Bob Hoskins Press Conference

Q: I'd like to go back to one of your more commercial films, perhaps it's not your favourite, but I would like to know what attracted you Mario Bros.? Because it was going to open the doors to others possibly or you just liked the idea of the film itself? I'm sure I've said the name incorrectly but I'm sure you know what film I am referring to.

A: You're talking about Super Mario Brothers. Super Mario Brothers had a husband and wife directing team whose arrogance convinced everybody of their genius, but I'm afraid the genius wasn't there, and we watch this completely lost. It started off a very good script, but the first day they threw the script away, and they said: we'll do this our way. And when they're gone over ten million dollars their own agents threw them off the set, then we said: we've got to finish this film ourselves. The editor came down and said: I don't know what we are gonna do, we haven't one single finished scene. So basically in a week, in two weeks, we had to cobble together the film and what could have been a very, very interesting film went up... rubbish, complete rubbish. My attraction was the money in the first place (little laughter in the room).
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

John Leguizamo

'Mario's Great Challenge: Despite Fearsome Odds And Galling Setbacks, It Appears The Movie Will Actually Come Out'

and

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

"New pages," mutters John Leguizamo, who's been cast as Luigi Mario. "Every day's a new page. It's like waiting for the news. What the hell happened yesterday? And there it is: All new, all live. 24 hours: Ding, ding, ding."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Dennis Hopper

'Mario's Great Challenge: Despite Fearsome Odds And Galling Setbacks, It Appears The Movie Will Actually Come Out'

and

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

"I suspect it will probably be rewritten," Hopper said. His eyebrows are shaven and his hair sculpted into dinosaur ridges to make him resemble the archenemy of the brothers Mario, the evil King Koopa, a descendant of Tyrannosaurus rex. "The script had probably been rewritten five or six times by the time I arrived here," he added. "I don`t really bother with it anymore. I just go in and do it scene by scene. I figure it's not going to hurt my character."

"The directors won't give interviews?" Hopper asked, after being told of Morton and Jankel's decision not to talk to the press about their work.

"That's the smartest thing I've heard from them. That's the only intelligent thing I've heard that they've really actually done."

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Dennis Hopper Talks Super Mario Bros. the Movie

I made a picture called Super Mario Bros., and my six-year-old son at the time -- he's now 18 -- he said, 'Dad, I think you're probably a pretty good actor, but why did you play that terrible guy King Koopa in Super Mario Bros.?' and I said, 'Well Henry, I did that so you could have shoes,' and he said, 'Dad, I don't need shoes that badly.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Random Roles: Dennis Hopper

Super Mario Bros. (1993)—"King Koopa"

Dennis Hopper: Wow, you really did a jump there. [Laughs.] My son, who's now 18 years old, was 6 or 7 when I did that movie, and he came up to me after he saw it and he said, "Daddy, I think you're probably a really good actor, but why did you play King Koopa?" And I said, "Why?" And he said, "Well he's such a bad guy, why did you want to play him?" And I said, "Well, so you can have shoes." And he said, "I don't need shoes." [Laughs.] So that was my 7-year-old's impression. It was a nightmare, very honestly, that movie. It was a husband-and-wife directing team who were both control freaks and wouldn't talk before they made decisions. Anyway, I was supposed to go down there for five weeks, and I was there for 17. It was so over budget. But I bought a couple buildings down there in Wilmington, NC, and I started painting. I made an art studio out of one.

AVC: You had a real run there in the '90s of playing villains in big movies like Super Mario Bros., Speed, and Waterworld. Was that fun for you?

Dennis Hopper: Speed and Waterworld… I like both of those films, actually. I did not like Super Mario Bros. I thought Waterworld got a bad name for itself in the United States, but it did really well in Europe and Asia. I think the studio sort of shot themselves in the foot by announcing it was so over budget, blah blah blah, it's going to be a failure… All this came out before we released it in the States. But I enjoyed it. And Speed, I really loved; I thought it was a terrific movie. Jan De Bont's first directorial job, coming from being a cinematographer. He did a terrific job. That was fun.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Fiona Shaw

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

But a recent solution chosen by the directors is to put Hopper and Fiona Shaw, who plays Koopa's queen, into a mud bath with $3,000 worth of worms.

"The first script I got was witty," sighs Shaw, whose previous credits include the doctor in "My Left Foot." "That was maybe 10 scripts ago. Now they're talking about taking a bath with worms."

But Shaw's courage inspired the directors to add the tub of worms. During a scene in the Boom Boom bar, they had instructed Shaw to sip from a shot glass containing a worm. Assuming the worm was fake, she'd done as directed--only to find it wiggling from her lips. Shaw had maintained her professional composure until after the take. The directors loved it so much they'd asked her to do it again. She had reluctantly done so... and did it again... and again....

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Harold Ramis

Harold Ramis Glad He Turned Down Mario Movie

(Video mentioning the statement)

Harold Ramis: (Producer) Roland Joffe wanted me to direct the Super Mario Bros. movie. I took the meeting because I loved the game,” Ramis told the Associated Press. The AP notes that this may have been the veteran comedy actor/director’s "smartest career decision,...
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Shigeru Miyamoto

MIYAMOTO: THE INTERVIEW

Edge: What are your thoughts on the Disney Super Mario Bros. movie?

Shigeru Miyamoto: Well, when we first initiated talks about a Super Mario Bros, movie, I tried to emphasize the point that the Mario Bros. games are fun as videogames and if we were going to make a Mario Bros. movie, that movie should be entertaining as a movie, and not a translation of the videogame. I think that they tried very hard and in the end it was a very fun project that they put a lot of effort into. The one thing that I still have some regrets about is that the movie may have tried to get a little too close to what the Mario Bros. videogames were. And in that sense, it became a movie that was about a videogame, rather than being an entertaining movie in and of its self.

Edge: Are there any particular movies or TV shows that influence your game making?

SM: I do watch a lot of movies and I’m fan of TV shows. It’s really hard for me to pinpoint one particular film or TV show that’s really influenced my work. I would say that probably on a whole, I’ve been influenced by what’s going on in film and television. I think in particular, the comedy drama and the tools that they use have been particularly influential in the work that I have done.

Edge: There’s been so much talk about the convergence of Hollywood and videogames. Where do you see the future of interactive entertainment?

SM: I think that there are a lot of commonalities between the videogame industry and Hollywood in terms of the resources they have to create the work that they are doing. In particular, when it comes to graphics, it can be a very intensive process to create videogame graphics. Similarly, the special effects and computer graphics that Hollywood is using in movies today can be a very intensive process. So I think that there is going to be a lot of opportunity for Hollywood and videogames in the creation of these intensive assets to share the resources. I think there will be more shared assets between movies and games, whether it’s a game that’s appearing as a movie or a movie that’s appearing as a game. It’s still important to understand that the composition of a videogame is very different from the composition and the structure of a movie. So being able to share those resources between two very talented directors in each of those realms is possible, but they must also work in the game world and film world so the projects can stand independently and are two entertainment pieces.

Iwata Asks: New Super Mario Bros. Wii

That's why when discussion started about making it into a movie, I got really nervous. I thought: "How are they going to film blocks suspended in mid-air?" When we made the game, it would start off with a large number of blocks and Mario would go along smashing those until there was just a single block floating there. We decided that ending up with just one block floating there didn't seem to feel unnatural, and we made the game with that in mind.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Other - Production

Rocky Morton

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

(Reached after the production had wrapped, co-director Rocky Morton said he didn't want to comment on the frustrated comments of the cast and crew. "It was a tough schedule. It was a big project. It was just very, very difficult." He found nothing unusual about the various rewrites. "Doesn't that always happen?")
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Roland Joffe

'Mario's Great Challenge: Despite Fearsome Odds And Galling Setbacks, It Appears The Movie Will Actually Come Out'

and

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

"Rocky and Annabel invented this idea that (an) old king had gotten devolved into a kind of primal organism, and a few of the cells escaped and... began growing into fungus, but fungus with a conscious mind," Joffe explained. Eventually the fungus became a character. Made of fishing-lure base and hot glue by prop designer Murton, it evolved to heroic, plot-point stature, destined to be the savior of Mario and Luigi.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Joffe, determined to maintain the integrity of his first purely producing effort, resists the savior role. "I hope to be the kind of producer I'd want as a director," he says. "As a producer I don't intrude. I suggest and guide by asking questions. Sometimes I find my voice in this very technological film is one that's asking, 'Yes, but what about the character? What does the audience feel?' And it's a learning process for me, to ask them."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

"We fought very hard to get the project," remembers Joffe of the bidding war for the movie rights in 1990. "There were a lot of contenders." But none had what Nintendo considered a viable solution to the absence of a plot.

"I went with a storyboard and story outline," Joffe says of his initial pitch meeting to Nintendo President Hiroshi Wayauchi. "I said, 'This won't be the story, but it'll be a story that contains some of these elements.' I was improvising."

Joffe knew that he wanted to make Mario Mario and Luigi Mario real people, not computer generated or animated cartoon figures. His concept won their infant production company Lightmotive the movie rights to "Super Mario Bros." Joffe believes Nintendo trusted him to actually get the film made, that it would not become just "another studio project" left on a development shelf.

It also didn't hurt that Eberts and Joffe offered "a creative partnership" allowing Nintendo to retain merchandising rights.

So in 1990 Lightmotive paid $2 million for a three-word plot: "Super Mario Bros." Now what? "We needed to find a way into this story to bring the game to life, that gave everything a kind of reality and created a myth of its own," Joffe decided. "The game is made up of an odd mixture of Japanese fairy tales and bits of modern America."

Joffe visited Nintendo headquarters in Kyoto, the ancient imperial capital of Japan. There he met the game's creator, Shigeru Miyamoto, who explained that Mario had initially been inspired by the company's office landlord in New York. Miyamoto further explained that the Koopa Kids were modeled after the team that designed Game 3. Joffe learned that the precise translation of "Super Mario Bros. 2" into English is "Doki Doki Panic."

But during the nights in Kyoto, Joffe slept on tatami mats, "just as the Japanese have been sleeping for 3,000 years." During the days, he visited the "completely sanitized" Nintendo Headquarters where "rooms are so airtight to keep out the dust and everyone wears white coveralls." Afterward, he'd visit ancient temples and discuss mythology.

Joffe returned to Los Angeles with at least a feel for "these conjunctions of images." He wanted to capture on screen whatever elusive archetypal qualities made the video game so compelling to an entire generation of children--including his own son, who loved playing the game that his father couldn't master. "How do we catch this wonderful mixture of images and inputs and strangeness?" Joffe wondered.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

"We made some mistakes," acknowledges Joffe. "We tried some various avenues that didn't work, that came up too medieval or somehow wasn't the right thing. I felt the project was taking a wrong turn. And that's when I began thinking of 'Max Headroom.' " Joffe admired the television program about a computer generated talk-show host who became a British cult hero in 1985. He went to Rome to meet with two of Headroom's creators, Rocky Morton and Annabel Jankel.

Joffe remembers their immediate description of their immediate version of the Super Mario story: "65 million years ago, when the meteor hit the Earth where Brooklyn is today, it pushed a small group of dinosaurs into a sub-dimension, and they evolved into something like us--humans descended from reptiles."

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Dinoyork was born: an alternative reality, a kind of reverse version of contemporary America but "basically a reptilian society and therefore infinitely more brutal than our mammalian society," says Joffe. "So it's a wonderful parody of New York and heavy industry. We call it the New Brutalism."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

"I wanted the concentrated energy of a studio and the obsessive focus of being on location," Joffe realized. "And you couldn't get anything more New Brutalist than a deserted cement factory."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Fred Caruso

'Mario's Great Challenge: Despite Fearsome Odds And Galling Setbacks, It Appears The Movie Will Actually Come Out'

and

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

"It's not unusual to go through many script changes," says co-producer Fred Caruso, whose distinguished career includes "The Godfather" and "The Bonfire of the Vanities," "and especially with this particular film because this comes from a video game that has no story. Everything we're doing is made up and it comes from the flow of what we're shooting. All the games have are the characters."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Dean Semler

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

Pg. 2

During one production meeting, the two directors had insulted director of photography Dean Semmler by giving him their list of camera setups for the week's shoot, plus specific lenses and light readings. "Why'd you hire me?" shouted the Oscar-winning cinematographer of "Dances With Wolves."

Parker Bennett

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

"It's the best kind of work there is," said an elated Bennett of his unexpected fortune, "the last minute. All the actors know their characters. They come to us. They're looking for solutions rather than options, so it's high energy."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Other - Crew

Patrick Tatopoulos

Patrick Tatopoulos: The Man Behind The Monster

The inevitable followed as Tatopoulos separated from MEL when he was contacted to design the main street sets and characters for SUPER MARIO BROS. "I was the conceptual designer, but the producers additionally asked me to create the characters. I called upon MEL and people who I met there, including Mark Maitre, Dave Nelson, and Rob Burman." Of this time, Burman noted that Tatopoulos' versatility was shining through. "Patrick had pretty much designed everything and we worked from his drawings. Also, he sculpted several really dynamic pieces. He's an incredible artist, just amazing."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Mike Elizalde

Interview with Mike Elizalde of Spectral Motion

EM: Did you sculpt them as well?
ME: No, I didn't sculpt them. The cosmetic work was done by ADl's staff of sculptors and character designers. But just before that I was working with Dave Nelson in Agoura Hills at his company called Animated Engineering. That was a great experience working directly with Dave Nelson as one of the mechanical designers. Again, he's one of those people who demands the best.

EM: I'm not that familiar with Dave Nelson's career. Can you tell us some of the films that he's done?
ME: He did a film called Fluke, and he did the Yoshi dinosaur puppet for Super Mario Brothers the Movie, and a fake head of Christopher Lloyd for an episode of Amazing Stories while in Stan Winston's employ. He was also a chief mechanical designer for Chucky under Kevin Yagher, so he's done quite a bit of work.

Image
Yoshi from Super Mario Brothers.
Animatronic design by Dave Nelson
of Animated Engineering.


Image
Yoshi with skin. Designed by
Mark Maitre.


EM: So you worked for him on Super Mario Brothers?
ME: Yes, we worked together on Super Mario Brothers. We were really proud of the Yoshi puppet. Dave designed most of that and let us design parts of it. It turned out wonderfully. That's when Dave recommended me to ADI.[...]

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

David L. Snyder

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

Pg. 5

"As each script developed," remembers designer David L. Snyder, "the fungus was sort of a metaphor for the mushroom element in a Nintendo game. In a Nintendo game, the mushrooms are the opponents for the allies, depending on what side of the game you're playing. Mushrooms and fungus are in the same family. The metaphor for the mushrooms is the fungus, and as time went on it became a character. All of a sudden, it's like a gigantic character and it became this deposed king of this world that Koopa has taken over. So it developed and we had a company go in and do a survey, and they did a report and came up with five stages of growth of this fungus."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

Pg. 8

Designer Snyder and his craftsmen had found a unique opportunity: "In this building, with all the existing concrete structure, we could hang the scenery from the structure, and not have to build scaffolding, and could integrate the concrete structure into the film's design."

The factory's remaining machinery--such as two 400-foot-long rotating kilns that once melted gravel at 2,800 degrees--quickly became fodder for Snyder. He constructed an exterior street--Dinoyork's Koopa Square--inside the mill.

'In 'Blade Runner,' the street was one level," says Snyder. "Here I have a street level, a pedestrian walkway and above that Koopa's Room, plus six or seven stories in height. I have more flexibility in layering of levels. It's a major, major opportunity. You'd never be able to do this on a sound stage. There isn't a sound stage big enough."

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Simon Murton

'Mario's Great Challenge: Despite Fearsome Odds And Galling Setbacks, It Appears The Movie Will Actually Come Out'

and

'The Bros. Mario Get Super Large: Take the world's most popular video game, add $40 million, some Koopa Troopa turtles, two rewrite-happy directors and outspoken actors like Dennis Hopper and Bob Hoskins, then mix together in a deserted cement factory...'

"It can get confusing and somewhat crazy," confesses prop designer Simon Murton, "but two directors give you two points of view. They have very, very fertile minds but they're constantly changing into newer, better ideas. So I rush things to completion before they change again."
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Beth Rubino

'Super Mario Brothers' will go from TV screen to the big screen at Christmas

Along with Beth Rubino, the set decorator, and Walter Martishius, the art director, Mr. Snyder spent months trying to conjure a seedy, claustrophobic, hostile but oddly invigorating New York City -- one for reptiles and dinosaurs as well as plumbers, of course -- filled with vendors that sell blood tonics, knife salesmen, soapbox preachers and eternally broken cash machines.

"We took the city and stretched it into an odd carnivorous exaggeration of itself," said Ms. Rubino, who lives in New York and hopes the movie conveys the design team's deep affection for the city. "The subway, the street peddlers, the newsstands are all there -- just different. On a good summer evening, you can stroll into the heart of the city and everything on earth is for sale there. So we did that, too. But we made sure to put a little edge on it."
Last edited by Redstar on Thu Aug 05, 2010 6:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official interviews and statements

Postby Zack » Sat Jan 09, 2010 3:34 pm

great job in compiling these lists...

Bob Hoskins

He accepts there have been flops, and films he's detested, but that's the nature of the game. "The worst thing I ever did? Super Mario Brothers. It was a fuckin' nightmare. The whole experience was a nightmare. It had a husband-and-wife team directing, whose arrogance had been mistaken for talent. After so many weeks their own agent told them to get off the set! F***in' nightmare. F***in' idiots
"What single celled organism did you evolve from?"
User avatar
Zack
Fried Tweeter--Only 20 Koopons
 
Posts: 269
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 5:12 pm

Re: Official interviews and statements

Postby Redstar » Sat Mar 06, 2010 8:35 am

The Mario wiki currently uses the above Bob Hoskins quote on his page, which I think is rather distasteful for both the man and the encyclopedia... Any suggestions on a more endearing quote that could be used, which better presents Bob and the film?
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official interviews and statements

Postby Redstar » Wed Sep 01, 2010 4:31 am

Patrick Tatopoulos

Patrick Tatopoulos: The Man Behind The Monster

The inevitable followed as Tatopoulos separated from MEL when he was contacted to design the main street sets and characters for SUPER MARIO BROS. "I was the conceptual designer, but the producers additionally asked me to create the characters. I called upon MEL and people who I met there, including Mark Maitre, Dave Nelson, and Rob Burman." Of this time, Burman noted that Tatopoulos' versatility was shining through. "Patrick had pretty much designed everything and we worked from his drawings. Also, he sculpted several really dynamic pieces. He's an incredible artist, just amazing."
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official interviews and statements

Postby Redstar » Tue Sep 07, 2010 2:08 am

Mike Elizalde

Interview with Mike Elizalde of Spectral Motion

EM: Did you sculpt them as well?
ME: No, I didn't sculpt them. The cosmetic work was done by ADl's staff of sculptors and character designers. But just before that I was working with Dave Nelson in Agoura Hills at his company called Animated Engineering. That was a great experience working directly with Dave Nelson as one of the mechanical designers. Again, he's one of those people who demands the best.

EM: I'm not that familiar with Dave Nelson's career. Can you tell us some of the films that he's done?
ME: He did a film called Fluke, and he did the Yoshi dinosaur puppet for Super Mario Brothers the Movie, and a fake head of Christopher Lloyd for an episode of Amazing Stories while in Stan Winston's employ. He was also a chief mechanical designer for Chucky under Kevin Yagher, so he's done quite a bit of work.

Image
Yoshi from Super Mario Brothers.
Animatronic design by Dave Nelson
of Animated Engineering.


Image
Yoshi with skin. Designed by
Mark Maitre.


EM: So you worked for him on Super Mario Brothers?
ME: Yes, we worked together on Super Mario Brothers. We were really proud of the Yoshi puppet. Dave designed most of that and let us design parts of it. It turned out wonderfully. That's when Dave recommended me to ADI.[...]
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official interviews and statements

Postby Phlibbit » Tue Sep 07, 2010 8:24 pm

Nice post, Redstar. It should prove helpful for the upcoming interview!

Upon re-examining some of these interview statements, I really found this Bob Hoskins one wildly interesting:

San Sebastian Film Festival - Bob Hoskins Press Conference

Q: I'd like to go back to one of your more commercial films, perhaps it's not your favourite, but I would like to know what attracted you Mario Bros.? Because it was going to open the doors to others possibly or you just liked the idea of the film itself? I'm sure I've said the name incorrectly but I'm sure you know what film I am referring to.

A: You're talking about Super Mario Brothers. Super Mario Brothers had a husband and wife directing team whose arrogance convinced everybody of their genius, but I'm afraid the genius wasn't there, and we watch this completely lost. It started off a very good script, but the first day they threw the script away, and they said: we'll do this our way. And when they're gone over ten million dollars their own agents threw them off the set, then we said: we've got to finish this film ourselves. The editor came down and said: I don't know what we are gonna do, we haven't one single finished scene. So basically in a week, in two weeks, we had to cobble together the film and what could have been a very, very interesting film went up... rubbish, complete rubbish. My attraction was the money in the first place (little laughter in the room).


What do you guys think of this? It's one of the most thought-provoking comments on the film I've seen from Hoskins after the actual release of the film.

Some of the film-era interviews I've read from him do state that he liked the script, and it's interesting to see him repeat that here. I wonder what "we'll do this our way" meant? I've heard the whole "they threw the script out on day one" thing quite a bit--what did Morton and Jankel try to do? Did they think they could forgo conventional filming methods and do their own thing? And this then resulted in going over schedule, over budget, and eventually came back to bite them in the end?

Upon confirmation in the Mike/Mark interview, we do know that they left the project at one point--and Dean Semler took over--and according to Hoskins, this was only for about two weeks? You would've thought at that point Morton and Jankel would've just finished the thing. And the editor said they hadn't finished one single scene? I wonder to what extent?

And having Hoskins still mention that SMB "could have been a very, very interesting film" really speaks to the fact that he saw something in it as well. This is exactly why something like an extended cut or director's cut or something is sorely needed for the film.
User avatar
Phlibbit
SMB Archaeologist
 
Posts: 1095
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 9:41 pm

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Redstar » Thu Nov 18, 2010 4:36 am

Due to the recent discovery of several articles published before the film's release (as I've posted in the Official Publication Thread) this thread has been updated to include statements from cast and crew. There's quite a bit and it can be difficult to understand due to lack of context so I'd recommend reading the full articles. This thread should be used merely as a quick resource.
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby billbot85 » Tue Nov 23, 2010 8:20 pm

loving all the updated additions! Pretty cool that Mark McCoy helped detail the police cars. I actually remember finding the article by Tyme while googling around one day, and glad that its here!! These all really help fill in on how the media felt about this film during the time and getting to know all the detailed making-of tidbits is a real plus!
"Sir...the goombas are dancing again."
User avatar
billbot85
Fried Tweeter--Only 20 Koopons
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:01 am
Location: Fairhaven, MA

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Redstar » Sun Dec 12, 2010 6:35 am

billbot85 wrote:loving all the updated additions! Pretty cool that Mark McCoy helped detail the police cars. I actually remember finding the article by Tyme while googling around one day, and glad that its here!! These all really help fill in on how the media felt about this film during the time and getting to know all the detailed making-of tidbits is a real plus!

Seems there was quite a buzz concerning the movie just before release and even a bit after. It was a big deal. Many people don't realize just how big a deal. It's been pretty amazing turning up all these interviews and articles. :P
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Prime Evil » Mon Dec 13, 2010 5:09 pm

RE: Redstar

I notice you mentioned a Patrick Tatopoulos in there and I just had a brainwave: do you think whoever wrote the script for Godzilla 1998 named its protagonist, Nick Tatopoulos, after this man? It might not be too much of a stretch, especially if he worked on the movie.
Prime Evil
You Just Gotta Believe
 
Posts: 487
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 3:26 pm

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Redstar » Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:14 pm

Prime Evil wrote:I notice you mentioned a Patrick Tatopoulos in there and I just had a brainwave: do you think whoever wrote the script for Godzilla 1998 named its protagonist, Nick Tatopoulos, after this man? It might not be too much of a stretch, especially if he worked on the movie.

I think you're exactly right. Patrick Tatopoulos was the key designer for Godzilla and supervised its creation while his company (Patrick Tatopoulos Creations) managed all the work. Can't say if they named the character after him, but since Emmerich and Tatopolous might have been friends it seems very likely. :)
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Peach Blossom » Fri Jan 21, 2011 3:55 pm

I haven't gotten a chance to read through all of these yet. However, I did read the quotes by Bob Hoskins, Dennis Hopper, and Fiona Shaw, all of which I found to be of much amusement. In particular from Bob's and Dennis' kids' opinions/questions on their work. It is so sad to think of the man we all remember as Mario from SMB and Eddie Valiant from Who Framed Roger Rabbit? not knowing the first thing about VCRs or the SMB game. XD

It isn't as much difficult to believe as it is to stomach in knowing that that was a real worm in Fiona Shaw's glass. I thought it only looked authentic. *cringes* I've always thought her a brilliant and beautiful actress. But I have even more admiration and respect for her now in learning that doing such a take didn't freak her out...not to mention that she did it multiple times!

It's a shame that the directors of SMB were so difficult to work with, thus making the actors and actresses hate doing the film. You'd never know it, though, judging by the impressive performances of everyone.
Image

Avatar by yappichick @ LiveJournal // Banner by Me
User avatar
Peach Blossom
Loyal, Lethal and Stupid
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 3:07 pm
Location: Over the rainbow...

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Redstar » Fri Jan 21, 2011 4:40 pm

Peach Blossom wrote:It isn't as much difficult to believe as it is to stomach in knowing that that was a real worm in Fiona Shaw's glass. I thought it only looked authentic. *cringes* I've always thought her a brilliant and beautiful actress. But I have even more admiration and respect for her now in learning that doing such a take didn't freak her out...not to mention that she did it multiple times!

She's a wonderful actress. Up until the point when she gets her 'Bride of Frankenstein' streak and goes absolutely insane Lena is probably the most interesting character in Dinohattan, even moreso than Koopa. Her motivation is certainly more apparent.

Peach Blossom wrote:It's a shame that the directors of SMB were so difficult to work with, thus making the actors and actresses hate doing the film. You'd never know it, though, judging by the impressive performances of everyone.

Be sure to read and comment on our site-exclusive interviews! You'll find that the cast & crew actually had more fun working on the project than these brief statements let on. :D
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Merwolf » Thu Jun 16, 2011 9:43 pm

Ya know I always had a hunch about situations like this. Honestly whenever an actor claims to hate a movie he/she did which also happen to get bad reviews, I dont always believe them. Heres what I mean: Okay so I believe that Bob broke his hand, and I might believe that the directors where Nazi's, But other than that I think they might have had alot more fun filming it than there willing to confess.

I honestly believe that some of them (espicially Bob and John) are just embarassed about its reception so they're SAYING that hated it just to make up for the fact that were in it. Its kinda like a "Maybe by hating this movie, I can get them to laugh WITH me, and not AT me. Or kinda like how some people have secret hobbies that are embarassing, so they pretend to not like it, so nobody knows.
User avatar
Merwolf
Loyal, Lethal and Stupid
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2011 3:06 pm

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Kamdan » Tue Jun 21, 2011 9:40 am

Bob Hoskins once again expreses how much he hates Super Mario Bros.
http://blog.games.yahoo.com/blog/780-bob-hoskins-hates-super-mario-bros-film
Kamdan
Loyal, Lethal and Stupid
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 8:10 pm

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Mario500 » Tue Jun 21, 2011 2:33 pm

Kamdan wrote:Bob Hoskins once again expres[s]es how much he hates Super Mario Bros.
http://blog.games.yahoo.com/blog/780-bob-hoskins-hates-super-mario-bros-film

I hope he appreciates how many folks love the movie in spite of his experience. It is like building a bridge: the work may have been tough or dangerous sometimes, but when folks express their love for your work, you will realize you had accomplished something far greater than personal gain: making people happy.
User avatar
Mario500
Loyal, Lethal and Stupid
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 8:47 pm

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Redstar » Tue Jun 21, 2011 3:48 pm

Mario500 wrote:I hope he appreciates how many folks love the movie in spite of his experience. It is like building a bridge: the work may have been tough or dangerous sometimes, but when folks express their love for your work, you will realize you had accomplished something far greater than personal gain: making people happy.

You put that very eloquently, Mario500. You really got across the joy the movie gives and the way that Bob should see the film and his contribution to it. It's a shame that after nearly two decades he can't seem to let go.

Yeah, it was a hard shoot, but even Leguizamo has softened. His own kids love it, so he can understand appreciate what it has to offer people.
User avatar
Redstar
Finally seen the Dark Knight trilogy
 
Posts: 2035
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Phlibbit » Tue Jun 21, 2011 7:37 pm

^UGH.

And guess what? This new Hoskins "interview" made it to the front page of IGN Movies. Here's their "article" on the matter, which is very similar to Kotaku's:

http://movies.ign.com/articles/117/1177726p1.html

The funny thing is, so far the article has 192 comments and counting. Not only is that a staggering number, but it's also pretty staggering for an IGN article as well. Especially one that has very, very little substance.

I think that shows that for whatever reason--people love talking about the SMB Movie, whether they're trashing it OR defending it.
User avatar
Phlibbit
SMB Archaeologist
 
Posts: 1095
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 9:41 pm

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby billbot85 » Tue Jun 21, 2011 10:55 pm

Phlibbit wrote:The funny thing is, so far the article has 192 comments and counting. Not only is that a staggering number, but it's also pretty staggering for an IGN article as well. Especially one that has very, very little substance.

I think that shows that for whatever reason--people love talking about the SMB Movie, whether they're trashing it OR defending it.

Good point. I have seen the same kind of comments on Zack's youtube vids of the toys, an episode of Pixels to Plastic that reviewed the toys, and the uploads of the entire movie on youtube (which has over 1 million views on part 1 from one of the uploads). So debate about this film is really common.

Still surprises me that his hatred still burns for this movie though.
"Sir...the goombas are dancing again."
User avatar
billbot85
Fried Tweeter--Only 20 Koopons
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:01 am
Location: Fairhaven, MA

Re: Official Interviews and Statements Thread

Postby Serum » Tue Dec 20, 2011 8:51 am

I think I read in an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto somewhere that his only complaint about the movie was that he thought it was too close to the video-game, as in, too literal of an adaptation-- weird, considering this is the opposite of what most people think... But, there you have it, the man who created the Mushroom Kingdom saying that the movie that people say is nothing like the game hit too close to home for him. Wow.
KOOPA THE SPORTSMAN (Level 2)

General risk of Troll Attacks.
User avatar
Serum
No Leak Too Small
 
Posts: 1449
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 9:37 pm
Location: Downtown Dino Yawk


Return to Exclusive Interviews

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests